7 UP Natural Or Unnatural?


February 29, 2008 —

Whether you go out of your way to buy green products or couldn't care less about the difference between incandescent and LED, chances are you're fed up with the overwhelming wave of green marketing ploys that Madison Avenue has recently unleashed. There's nothing "natural" about 7-Up, the board of directors at BP isn't comprised of environmentalists, and Hummers can't be green — no matter how many nature shots get thrown into the ads.
For those of us who are passionate about spotting and debunking greenwashing when we see it, a new website offers an outlet. Greenwashing Index is a project of the EnviroMedia Social Marketing firm, which partnered with faculty from the University of Oregon School of Journalism with the hopes of giving consumers and interactive weapon against misleading advertising. The site allows users to post, critique and rate ads based on how reliable their eco-assertions are. Scores range from "good," to "pushing it," to "total greenwashing." Maybe it's not going to keep Kermit the Frog from selling SUV'S, but the faster greenwashing awareness spreads, the sooner companies will get the message that green shoppers want improved products, not empty slogans.

Greenwash Detectors
Greenwash Detectors


"We’ve been witnessing a tidal wave of green advertising over the past year. It's our hope the Greenwashing Index will help eradicate bad environmental marketing claims and, at the same time, shine a positive light on companies making measurable reductions in carbon emissions related to climate change."
-EnviroMedia President Kevin Tuerff


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7Up and its makers Cadbury Schweppes have been trying to convince everyone with a new advertising campaign that 7Up is "100% Natural." However, they've left in the very unhealthy high fructose corn syrup. Now the Center for Science in the Public Interest is taking them to task, saying 7Up cannot be called 100% natural if it contains high fructose corn syrup.

"Pretending that soda made with high fructose corn syrup is 'all natural,' is just plain old deception," said CSPI executive director Michael F. Jacobson. "High fructose corn syrup isn't something you could cook up from a bushel of corn in your kitchen, unless you happen to be equipped with centrifuges, hydroclones, ion-exchange columns, and buckets of enzymes." (Washington Post).

http://www.healthdiaries.com/eatthis/7up-natural-or-unnatural.html


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January 16, 2007


Cadbury-Schweppes says it will no longer market 7UP as "All Natural." Rather, the company says it will highlight ingredients "for which there is no debate" over whether they are natural, which will obviously exclude the controversial factory-made sweetener known as high-fructose corn syrup.
The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) will drop a planned lawsuit against the company now that the misleading "all natural" claims will be halted. CSPI notified Cadbury-Schweppes of the possibility of a lawsuit in May and has discussed labeling issues with the company off and on since then.
"We are pleased that Cadbury-Schweppes has fixed what was a flawed and deceptive marketing campaign and that this issue was resolved without our actually suing," said CSPI litigation director Steve Gardner. "We look forward to seeing exactly which words the company uses to describe its ingredients on labels and on marketing materials, but trust they won't imply that high-fructose corn syrup is 'natural.'"
High-fructose corn syrup is nutritionally similar to natural table sugar, which comes from sugar cane or sugar beets. But in to contrast to table sugar, high-fructose corn syrup is made through a complex chemical industrial process in which corn starch molecules are enzymatically reassembled into glucose and fructose molecules.

Read more: http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2007/01/7up_natural.html#ixzz0diwbg0qq


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The company that makes the "uncola" is accused of telling an untruth in a new marketing campaign that touts 7UP as "100% natural." The nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) will sue 7UP's manufacturer, Cadbury Schweppes, unless the company drops the claim.
Although the company removed several artificial ingredients from the drink, at least one remains: high fructose corn syrup.
Sunny new television ads for 7UP show cans of the drink being picked from fruit trees, or harvested from the ground, yet there is no fruit juice in 7UP. The narrator says it "tastes better than ever because we stripped out all the artificial stuff leaving just five all natural ingredients."
Besides carbonated water and high fructose corn syrup, the other three are citric acid, unspecified "natural flavors," and potassium citrate. Though not any better or worse nutritionally than plain table sugar, high fructose corn syrup is spawned from a complex, multistep industrial process by which starch is extracted from corn and converted with acids or enzymes into glucose and fructose.
"Pretending that soda made with high fructose corn syrup is 'all natural,' is just plain old deception," said CSPI executive director Michael F. Jacobson. "High fructose corn syrup isn't something you could cook up from a bushel of corn in your kitchen, unless you happen to be equipped with centrifuges, hydroclones, ion-exchange columns, and buckets of enzymes."
In a legal notice to Cadbury Schweppes executives, CSPI litigation director Steve Gardner wrote that the primary purpose of the suit would be to prohibit the company from describing any product with high fructose corn syrup as "natural," and that CSPI would also seek restitution, corrective advertising, and attorneys' fees.


Read more: http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/05/cspi_uncola.html#ixzz0dohDps6a



Edited by: Sara Dash
January 29, 2010